What is the Mabelle Arole Rehabilitation Center?

In 1999, CRHP received a grant to create the Mabelle Arole Rehabilitation Center (MARC). The center was built on CRHP’s Khadkat Farm not as a shelter, but as a place of true rehabilitation. The center accommodates the destitute and abandoned, victims of domestic violence, and those suffering from stigmatized diseases such as leprosy, tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS. As part of their rehabilitation, the women assist in all aspects of running the farm and in return receive a monthly stipend. While living at the farm, the women at the MARC learn animal husbandry, vermiculture, irrigation techniques, and relevant farming methods for the arid climate. They gain skills, knowledge, confidence, and eventually are responsible for managing and maintaining the farm. Furthermore, these women assist in CRHP’s agricultural seminars held for local and foreign farmers, teaching farming techniques they have learned. Over the course of four to seven years, these women are rehabilitated through intensive therapy, medical treatment, proper nutrition, and a caring, constant support group. Women at the MARC receive healthy food from the farm, clothing, shelter, living supplies, medications, and transport to medical facilities for care free of charge. After undergoing rehabilitation at the Center, participants transform into self-confident, economically self-sufficient women. When a woman is ready to leave the MARC, CRHP works with her to build a house in her village, supporting her in the transition from life at the center to life in the village.

Who does the Mabelle Arole Rehabilitation Center serve?

The Mabelle Arole Rehabilitation Center serves women destitute and abandoned, victims of domestic violence, and those suffering from stigmatized diseases such as leprosy, tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS and their dependent family members.

What are the goals of the Mabelle Arole Rehabilitation Center?

  • To physically, mentally, and spiritually rehabilitate women and their dependent family members who are destitute, abandoned, victims of domestic violence, and those suffering from stigmatized diseases such as leprosy, tuberculosis, or HIV/AIDS
  • To prepare disadvantaged women to return to their communities as productive and contributing members of society
  • To educate survivors on animal husbandry, vermiculture, irrigation techniques, and relevant farming methods for the arid climate